Orange Lodge

The Orange Lodge was an important part of the Protestant social experience. The local Orange Order Branch 1410 was founded in 1874 and this lodge building was built in 1891. In 1995 the building was moved to the Village and remains one of a few active Lodges in the province.

Read More
Megan Barton
Outdoor Oven

This oven was built by the Friends of the Duggan House to resemble an oven that pioneers would use outdoors in the summer. A fire was lit in the oven, once the coals are hot, they are pushed back. The heated clay bakes pastries, breads and biscuits. The base of this oven was built using local rock and the top was constructed out of locally donated clay.

Read More
Megan Barton
Pavilion

The pavilion is a post and beam style, rustic building recently constructed as a gathering place at KSV. It offers an open air gathering space for picnics, weddings and events. It also has large doors than can be opened or closed to assist with weather conditions. Since it's erection in 2016, this building has been a great asset to KSV in allowing for an additional covered usage space.

Read More
Megan Barton
School House

Our School House was originally part of an early 1900’s cottage located on Sturgeon Lake. It was restored as a pioneer school house utilizing desks and materials from older schools no longer in existence, see the board on the wall with pictures of old local schools. The School House is a vital part of our Summer Camp and our Elementary Day programs.

Read More
Megan Barton
Shanty

This log shanty is a reproduction of the original type of building constructed by the settlers in the area. Bruce Smith constructed this shanty using axes, logs from locally grown cedar and masonry materials for the “fireplace” and chimney. When settlers first arrived to farm a plot of land, they would first stay in a canvas tent. Eventually, they would build these temporary houses to live in for the first winter or until they could build something larger. Upon moving out of these cabins, they would then be used to house animals or storage.

Read More
Megan Barton
The Harry Van Oudenaren Museum

Completed in 2018, this Harry Van Oudenaren Museum was donated by the Van Oudenaren Family. This building houses a collection of items collected and maintained by Harry himself. Harry has made a large contribution to the Village and Bobcaygeon as a whole by preserving history through photos and artifacts. Seeing his collection compiled in his museum is a true wonder.

Read More
Megan Barton
Trappers Cabin

European interest in Bobcaygeon began with fur trapping during the 1600’s and continues to be an important part of local recreational life. This cabin was a guide shack for Fiesta Village Fishing Resort in Bobcaygeon.

Read More
Megan Barton
Waterwheel

The waterwheel and replica grist mill project was completed in 2011 representing the importance of water powered equipment in pioneer life.

Read More
Megan Barton
Windmill

When Kawartha Settlers' Village was originally created, there was a strong desire for an operational windmill on the property. Lorne McKenzie came forward and offered one he had on his Red Rock property. Al Ingram approached Bruce with the task of reassembling the old windmill, which was in pretty rough shape. After an entire summer of bending old metal and refurbishing the old mill, Bruce was able to bring a local artifact back to life where it now stands at KSV.

Read More
Megan Barton
Woodworking Shop

Wood was plentiful in the early days and many of the items that the first settlers needed were made at home – bowls, rolling pins, tables, stools and shovels! Goods that could not be made at home could be bought or ordered through a merchant in town. Carpenters and blacksmiths often worked side by side (as are our buildings), each completing part of the project – barrels with iron hoops, wheels and rims, wagons and sleds!

Build in 2009, this building is a replica used to house our historic woodworking tools.

Read More
Megan Barton
Wray House

The Wray House is the oldest building at Kawartha Settlers’ Village, dating back to the 1850’s. It was built by the Wray family and lived in by four successive generations until Russell Wray donated it to the Village in 1998. The Settlers’ Village Quilters Guild restored the home, maintaining many original details like the bark ceiling logs but also updating it to facilitate their needs.

Read More
Megan Barton